Development Matters - Newsletter March 2018

11 Apr 2018
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The Global South rises to the challenge

In 1969, when UNDP was established in its current form, the world was a different place from the one we see today. It was one dominated by two superpowers, with many countries in Africa and Asia slowly emerging from colonialism to take charge of their own destinies after decades or centuries of external rule. The global aid system evolved in this context, one in which richer countries of the Global North extended grants, loans, goods and expertise to poorer countries of the Global South.

Today, nearly 50 years on, we inhabit a very different world. Although poverty, deprivation and inequality remain profound challenges, the countries of the Global South are rising, and their profound contributions to human and economic development are finally being recognized. Some, such as China, have seen dizzying economic growth. From being one of the poorest countries in the world during the 1960s, South Korea is now one of the richest. Bangladesh has reduced its child mortality rate by 73 percent in 25 years.

In this context, the older model of assistance to poorer countries as they progress along the path to development is no longer relevant. Instead, today, the model of South-South Cooperation lies at the heart of a global movement towards sustainable development that benefits all. Indeed, South-South Cooperation is recognized as fundamental to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as global commitments related to climate change.

Countries in the Global South – from Pakistan to Peru and from China to Chad – possess resources, expertise and the potential for trade, investment and cooperation that can potentially yield unprecedented dividends in health and education, infrastructure, economies and climate change preparedness. For instance, Pakistan, as a pioneer in conducting climate public expenditure reviews, has, in the past, offered lessons from its experience to other countries embarking on this essential step towards public finance management that is informed by climate change. Another example with great potential is Chinese infrastructure investment through the Belt and Road initiative, which includes the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) in Pakistan. This will build Chinese trade, while enhancing connectivity for 69 percent of the world’s population, and creating countless opportunities to develop local economies, services and human capacity. This can, potentially, be a win-win form of cooperation for the countries of the Global South.

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6689aad9-7dc9-4f83-8d93-76a007d608fa.pngDevelopment Matters
UNDP in Pakistan
Issue 16, March 2018
The People’s Republic of China and UNDP Pakistan sign US$4 million agreement to support crisis-affected areas of FATA and Balochistan

Video Gallery

 
Scaling up SDGs action to reach new heights of climate resilience and gender equality   Bridging the classroom divide in Balochistan
 
Building sustainable livelihoods in FATA   China-Pakistan relationship in light of South-South Cooperation
Featured Partner China Aid: The People’s Republic of China

5158ad73-3f77-499e-bb1a-650a594382d1.png Pakistan and China have established close political and economic cooperation which dates as far back as the 1950s. The People’s Republic of China has regularly extended cooperation to Pakistan in areas including trade, investment, engineering contracting and economic and technological cooperation.

Broad-based economic growth is essential for sustainable long-term development. It creates opportunities for impoverished households to raise their living standards, provides Pakistan with resources to expand access to critical services, and most importantly enables citizens to chart their prosperous futures.

China is playing a leading role in South-South cooperation and has already become a significant partner for many developing countries. This includes sharing China's experience, expertise, technology, as well as resources to advance development in other developing countries.

The People’s Republic of China and UNDP are partnering to develop a strategic cooperation framework that aims to enhance collaboration between UNDP and the Chinese government for the implementation of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Supporting development and humanitarian assistance in Pakistan, China has contributed to providing funds in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Balochistan that have been affected by natural and human-made crises.

Most recently, the Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) of the People's Republic of China provided US$4 million to support early recovery and rehabilitation of affected populations in Pakistan. These funds were critical in providing 56,700 people (8,100 families) in Kurram, South Waziristan, North Waziristan, Khyber, and Orakzai Agencies with construction kits to rebuild their homes, as well as essential household items. In Balochistan province, the districts of Naseerabad, Jafferabad, and Sohbatpur, which were the worst affected by the 2010–2011 floods, 375 schools received new furniture and education kits.

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Editorial

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Ignacio Artaza
Country Director

The Global South rises to the challenge

In 1969, when UNDP was established in its current form, the world was a different place from the one we see today. It was one dominated by two superpowers, with many countries in Africa and Asia slowly emerging from colonialism to take charge of their own destinies after decades or centuries of external rule. The global aid system evolved in this context, one in which richer countries of the Global North extended grants, loans, goods and expertise to poorer countries of the Global South.

Today, nearly 50 years on, we inhabit a very different world. Although poverty, deprivation and inequality remain profound challenges, the countries of the Global South are rising, and their profound contributions to human and economic development are finally being recognized. Some, such as China, have seen dizzying economic growth. From being one of the poorest countries in the world during the 1960s, South Korea is now one of the richest. Bangladesh has reduced its child mortality rate by 73 percent in 25 years.

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Improving Lives

“Being physically challenged, living in poverty, I could never think of a bright future for myself and my family. After completing training by UNDP, I get a paid internship with a master tailor in his area to gain more experience. For now I receive 150 rupees as commission on every suit I stich and my average income varies between 7,000 to 10,000 rupees per month.”
Mastan Jan, Khyber Agency, FATA

6df214e9-4099-4c1c-bdb0-ed50490558cf.jpg“My daughters and I struggled to make ends meet after my husband died. It has been almost thirty years, but we still do not have a stable income to manage our household expenses. We are grateful for this assistance from the People’s Republic of China.”
Neelo Bibi, Jamrud, Khyber Agency, FATA

In the News

 
Mountaineer Samina Baig is UNDP’s National Goodwill Ambassador for Pakistan   The Government of Japan and UNDP partner to support over 20,000 youth with skills training and employment opportunities
 
Paradigm shift in growth policy as research shows economic inequality is harmful for sustainable growth   New research shows major efforts are required to enhance women’s representation in Pakistan’s civil service

Success Stories

Access to water lightens women’s burdens
Building a sustainable future: China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in FATA
Our Partners These results were made possible with the support of our development partners and in partnership with the Government of Pakistan

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