Our Stories

  • Solar Powered Plant brings Clean Drinking Water to a Remote Village in Balochistan
    Jan 17, 2019

    For the past decade or so, Balochistan province has been affected by recurring droughts. Lack of water availability forced many people to migrate to distant towns—the situation deteriorated to a degree where boring water out of the ground had also become increasingly difficult. Village Killi Sardar Abdul Samad — situated within the parameters of Noshki Village was one such locality where water scarcity was unusually severe. Abdul Majeed, and his family had witnessed conditions become progressively worse over time. Some generations ago, when his ancestors first came to the village, there was plenty of clean drinking water for all residents. However, eight long months had passed without rain, causing groundwater to dry up.

  • Rehabilitation efforts bring children back to school
    Jan 17, 2019

    Until less than a year ago, Sakina Bibi and Zabihullah, still in the early years of childhood, spent their days running household errands — a sharp contrast to the carefree lives led by most children of school-going age. Sakina spent her days helping her mother fetch water from as far as ten kilometres away — the only fresh water source located near their house, while Zabihullah helped his father take the animals for grazing to nearby pastures.

  • Providing relief to small-scale farmers in the drought-affected Noshki District
    Jan 17, 2019

    For almost fifteen years, close to 12 million people living in the Southwestern province of Balochistan have been affected by water scarcity. With extreme levels of poverty and unemployment in many districts, the residents of Balochistan province often do not have much respite before the next drought threatens to affect their homes and livelihoods

  • If you can dream it, you can do it
    Dec 19, 2018

    “It was a bold decision to drop out of university and start my own business, that too when I had no specialised training in the field, but I did my best to convince my father. It took an entire year to convince my parents to support me,” said Waiz.

  • Paving the way to better education in Balochistan province
    Apr 21, 2018

    Coping with poverty and marginalisation has been a way of life for residents in the remote town of Bagan Baba, in Jaffarabad district, Balochistan province. For seven-year-old Shama, a resident of Bagan Baba, she spent most of her days helping her family with household chores. With a multi-dimensional poverty headcount of 75 percent in the Jaffarabad district of Balochistan province, Shama is amongst the fortunate few young girls who are supported by their families to attain a formal education.

  • Relief packages help vulnerable families get through the winter
    Apr 4, 2018

    As a child, Zia-ul-Haq (34) contracted polio. In his remote village of Chota Bizote in Orakzai Agency of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), high quality medical care was difficult to access. Although he survived the terrible disease, Zia’s legs were paralysed. Nevertheless, he was determined not to let his disability come in a way of leading a fulfilling life. He married and soon became a proud father.

  • FATA’s women-headed households
    Apr 4, 2018

    At ten years of age, Rahat Khan has no memory of his home in remote Orakzai Agency, in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), before it was swept by insecurity. In 2009 when he was only a toddler, the family was forced to leave their village as military operations against non-state actors intensified. They fled their home and settled for two years in Peshawar, the capital of neighbouring Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province. In 2011 they were able to return to their village in Orakzai Agency but tragedy soon struck again. With the region’s fragile health services devastated by the fighting, Rahat’s father died after a short illness. The family was without a male head of the household – a crucial need in FATA’s heavily male-dominated society, where women are often barred from any public dealings.

  • Vulnerable displaced families helped to rebuild homes in FATA
    Apr 4, 2018

    “We are living in abject poverty,” he says plainly. “I am always worried about my grandchildren. I am old and injured. It is very difficult for me to provide for them without asking others for help.” Ashraf’s situation rendered him and his family eligible for assistance from the China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in FATA and Balochistan. This UNDP-supported initiative provides basic humanitarian assistance to 8,100 vulnerable families that were temporarily displaced by insecurity in FATA as they return to rebuild their homes.

  • Water channel reduces village tensions in Swat
    Feb 15, 2018

    For generations, the people of Manglawar village in Swat district, north-western Pakistan, had relied on agriculture for their income. The land was fertile and it was located only three kilometres from the river, guaranteeing an ample supply of water for the crops using a system of mud channels that brought water to each field. With hard work and dedication, the 7,000 people of Manglawar flourished.

  • A new road brings uncountable benefits for Swat women
    Feb 14, 2018

    In the highly male dominated society of Swat district in Pakistan’s northwest, women’s need for mobility is often underestimated. Nor are their voices heard when they demand their right to access health, education, markets and workplaces. Shakaray village, Swat, was one such village. For many years, the only path connecting it to the nearest road consisted of a muddy 1.8 kilometre stretch of ruts and potholes. It was virtually impassable for vehicles, and difficult even for pedestrians to navigate. This had severe impacts on Shakaray’s women, who found themselves cut off from the outside world.

  • Jul 18, 2017

    When Sidra was 15 years of age, her family moved from Mirpurkhas, a small Pakistani agricultural town, to the metropolis of Karachi, hoping for better economic opportunities. Unfortunately, things did not work out as they hoped. In her Urdu-speaking community women were traditionally restricted from working, but her father and brother struggled to support the 11 members of the family. Sidra passed her intermediate examination but, like her seven sisters, was expected to stay at home until she was married, despite the family’s worsening economic situation.

  • Jul 18, 2017

    Manthaar Ali’s family are ethnic Sindhis who have lived in the violent Korangi neighbourhood of Karachi for generations. Over the years, they have seen the transformation of this area from a sleepy mangrove-lined village by the Arabian Sea to one of the world’s largest and fastest growing cities. Yet, even as millions came to Karachi looking for a better life, Manthaar’s family was left behind. His father is a night watchman in a fishing community, while his elder brother is a dockworker who works on daily wages and often goes weeks without work.

  • Jul 18, 2017

    The son of a rickshaw driver and one of eight children, Burhan began to work as a small child to help support the family. Although only 22 years of age, he has worked in Karachi’s oldest wholesale emporium, Boulton Market, as a daily wage labourer, administered vaccine drops to infants as part of the country’s polio eradication campaigns, and conducted quality assurance at a pharmaceutical company. Lacking education and belonging to a marginalized community, he was unable to turn any of these jobs into a career.

  • Jul 18, 2017

    Twenty-one-year-old Jehanzeb hails from Malir, an impoverished neighbourhood in Pakistan’s largest and most turbulent city, Karachi. With six brothers and four sisters, Jehanzeb started working as a small child, doing odd jobs to pay for his own education. In this way he completed his matriculation and enrolled in the intermediate programme at a local college.

  • Jul 17, 2017

    Any day with food on the table was a good day for Humera and her family of five. The daughter of a rickshaw driver in Korangi, an impoverished neighbourhood in Pakistan’s largest city Karachi, Humera, 20, had a tough childhood. Her father was the only breadwinner and struggled to support his family. “If we paid the rent, we couldn’t buy food. If we bought food, we couldn’t buy clothes. How could we expect to complete our education?” she says.

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