Our Stories

  • A boxer turned fashion designer inspires others to escape violence

    As a child Wasim Soomro watched as famous fashion designers showed their creations on television. He enjoyed seeing their creative designs and envied their rise to fame and fortune doing what they loved. “I used to watch famous celebrities become designers, flaunting their kurtas on TV. I told myself if they can do it, why can’t I? Lyari is famous for gang violence, but we don’t have any famous designers. I thought I should be the first one,” he saysd, clad in a blue kurta that he designed himself.

  • A new beginning for Shahnaz

    Shahnaz, a 32-year-old widow and her family of seven are among thousands of internally displaced person (IDP) families who lost their house, possessions and livelihoods upon their return to Bara, Khyber Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

  • Abdul Majeed works to improve his village with assistance from UNDP

    The day I arrived in Quetta, I met with the field team that would accompany me to the villages where UNDP Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas (RAHA) is working. After a brief introductory session, I asked the social mobiliser if he could find someone interesting for me to write about.

  • After years of insecurity, a traditional fair brings DI Khan  together

    Every year, thousands of people from around Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), Punjab, Balochistan and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) used to stream to the town of Dera Ismail (DI) Khan in KP province. They brought with them the expectation of sharing their culture, selling their wares and making business connections. Most of all they came to the Mela Aspan festival to enjoy themselves.

  • Amelia Rubin’s Journey

    Amelia is a certified volunteer community-based paralegal associated with the Community Development Programme (CDP) in Bannu, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and a bachelor’s student at the Kohat University of Science and Technology.

  • Breaking the bonds of intergenerational poverty

    Manthaar Ali’s family are ethnic Sindhis who have lived in the violent Korangi neighbourhood of Karachi for generations. Over the years, they have seen the transformation of this area from a sleepy mangrove-lined village by the Arabian Sea to one of the world’s largest and fastest growing cities. Yet, even as millions came to Karachi looking for a better life, Manthaar’s family was left behind. His father is a night watchman in a fishing community, while his elder brother is a dockworker who works on daily wages and often goes weeks without work.

  • Building civic engagement in marginalized communities

    Uzaira Tasneem is completing her bachelor’s degree from the University of Education, Lahore. True to her name, when she heard about the UN Volunteers programme, she decided to apply. “I always aspired to become a volunteer because it would get me closer to the community and the people,” she says.

  • Building inclusive livelihoods

    “In my village, after the father grows old, the eldest brother is responsible for providing financial support to the family,” says Samiullah Khan, a young man aged 23 living in Haibak Sherza Khan village, Bannu district, in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. “I felt helpless because I have four unmarried sisters and my younger brothers were hardly making ends meet.”

  • Building responsible citizenship

    Forty-two young people file into a classroom at the University of Management and Technology in Lahore, Pakistan. The two young women standing before them are only a few years older but, as the session begins, the group listens respectfully and with increasing interest. As the young women conclude their presentation, the questions comes quick and fast.

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